01.02.2021 – In Myanmar democracy has been suspended for at least one year. Coup d’état in Myanmar. Aung Sang Suu Kyi has been arrested.

Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
In Myanmar democracy has been suspended for at least one year. Coup d’état in Myanmar. Aung Sang Suu Kyi arrested. The victory in the elections of the Nobel Prize party does not please the military who accuse, without proof, of having been the victim of fraud.

Source from: Rai. RaiNews24.

1st of february 2021

The Burmese army has carried out a new coup. The military generals have announced the imposition of a state of emergency for a period of one year. Power now passes into the hands of the Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces General Min Aung Hlaing. The current head of the government, the Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung Sang Suu Kyi and the key members of the National League for Democracy were arrested. The news comes out of Burma, Myanmar, with great difficulty: during the night the broadcasts of public radio and television were interrupted and the internet networks have suffered serious interruptions and have blocked the access at the platforms of the social networks like as “facebook” or others. The move by the army comes on the day of the inauguration of the new parliament and after days of growing tension between the civilian government and the army. The Burmese army last week refused to rule out a coup to overturn last November’s election result that delivered a huge victory to Suu Kyi’s National League. Last week, tanks were deployed in some streets of the capital and in some cities where pro-military demonstrations were held. Aung San Suu Kyi has asked the people of her country not to give in to the coup, in a desperate appeal to overturn the attempt by the armed forces to impose a new dictatorship. “I urge the people not to accept, to respond and to protest wholeheartedly against the military coup”, Aung San Suu Kyi said in a statement released on her behalf. Local television announced this morning that the army has taken control of the country, with the transfer of all powers to the commander-in-chief, General Min Aung Hlaing, one of the main perpetrators of the persecution of the Muslim Rohingya minority. The military declared a state of emergency for a year and arrested senior government officials in response to alleged “fraud” committed by Aung San Suu Kyi’s party to prevail in last year’s elections. Telephone and internet services in Yangon have been shut down, while the town hall in the city has been manned by several soldiers who have arrived in several trucks since tonight. The area around the building was sealed off with barbed wire. State television MRTV, for its part, said it was unable to broadcast. Banking institutions remained closed. Only yesterday the armed forces had confirmed their commitment to loyalty to democracy. The military “will do all it can to adhere to the democratic norms of free and fair elections, as established by the 2008 Constitution, lasting peace and inclusive well-being and prosperity for the people of Myanmar”, read the statement, posted on Facebook. A group of Western countries, including the United States, issued a joint statement on Friday warning against “any attempt to alter the outcome of the elections or prevent Myanmar’s democratic transition”. In response, the military yesterday accused foreign diplomats of making “unjustified assumptions”. Under the 2008 constitution, the military gradually handed over power to democratic institutions. But it retains privileges including control of the security forces and some ministries. Legal appeals over the elections are pending in the Supreme Court. The electoral commission dismissed the military’s allegations of voting fraud, saying there were no mistakes big enough to affect the credibility of the vote. United States: detainees released The United States “continues to affirm its strong support for democratic institutions” in Burma and “in coordination with our partners in the area, we call upon the military and all other” stakeholders “to adhere to democratic norms and release prisoners”. This was stated by the White House, noting that President Joe Biden was briefed on events in Burma, including the arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi. The US, “alarmed” by the information coming from Burma, is opposed to any attempt to alter the result of the recent elections or prevent a democratic transition”. The United States” will act against those responsible if these measures are not revoked”: it has White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki made known in a statement referring to the arrests carried out in the context of the coup in Burma, including that of the head of government Aung San Suu Kyi.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, for his part, called on the Burmese army “to release all government officials as well as civil society leaders and to respect the will of the Burmese people expressed in the democratic elections on November 8”. Washington, like other Western countries, had urged the military on January 29 to “adhere to democratic standards”, while the army chief – General Min Aung Hlaing – declared that the country’s constitution could be “revoked” in certain circumstances. Italy condemns the arrests “Italy strongly condemns the wave of arrests in Myanmar and calls for the immediate release of Aung San Suu Kyi and all the political leaders arrested”. It can be read in a note from the Farnesina. “The will of the people has clearly emerged in the last elections and must be respected. We are concerned about this abrupt interruption of the democratic transition process and we ask that respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms be guaranteed”.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Myanmar. General Elections: Aung San Suu Kyi wins.

Source from: Notizie Geopolitiche.net.

14th of november 2020

In the Myanmar general elections, the NLD (National League for Democracy) party of Aung San Suu Kyi, state councilor of Burma, won the last elections with an overwhelming result. The first free elections were held in 2015, as the Burmese leader and the NLD party took power in March 2016 and have since entered into a power-sharing agreement with the generals who still hold enormous power.
The main challenger of the NLD party is the USDP (Union Solidarity and Development Party), which is supported by the military, which together with 23 other opposition parties had asked for the postponement of the vote due to the Covid-19 epidemic. This year’s elections were overshadowed not only by the coronavirus pandemic, but also by a very severe economic crisis.
In this electoral round more than 6,900 people from independent campaigns and 92 political parties stood as candidates, who stood in the elections in 1,171 seats. 25 percent of parliament seats are in the hands of the military, which corresponds to 166 seats on the basis of a controversial 2008 constitution drafted during the government of the junta.
The USDP headed by former army general Than Htay rejected the election results as invalid. The constitution also gives military control of three key ministries: such as Interior, Defense and Border Affairs.
The UCM (Union Election Commission) announced that the NLD has won 368 out of 434 seats in parliament, which gives it a comfortable majority to appoint the next parliament without requiring votes from representatives of other parties.
The NLD needed a minimum of 322 seats, the UCM reported, before finishing the count. The USDP won only 24 seats. The great unknown factor in the elections was the vote of the ethnic minorities residing in the peripheral areas of the country, many of which were war zones between the Myanmar army and the guerrillas.
The UCM canceled the votes in much of Rakhine State, where fighting between the military and the Arakan army composed mainly of the Rakhine Buddhist ethnic group has continued and which in recent years Suu Kyi has not been able to to cease.
The clashes resulted in tens of deaths and tens of thousands of displaced people. For these reasons, several constituencies were canceled in the elections, mainly inhabited by members of minorities and consequently some dozen seats are still vacant.
The Burmese parliament is bicameral and is composed of the House of Nationalities composed of 224 seats, of which 168 members are directly elected in single-member constituencies with an absolute majority with a second round if necessary and 56 appointed by the military for a term of 5 years.
The House of Representatives, on the other hand, is made up of 440 seats, currently 434 of which 330 members are directly elected in the single-member constituencies with a simple majority and 110 appointed by the military, while the members remain in office for 5 years.
In addition, an intense conflict where the military was accused of atrocities was what struck the Rohingya in 2017 after some 750,000 of them fled across the border to Bangladesh following a brutal crackdown by the Burmese army. similar to ethnic cleansing.
Burma’s de facto leader Suu Kyi has been criticized internationally for her policies against the Rohingya Muslim minority. This election round however showed that her popularity has not waned in the country since Burma began transitioning to a civilian-led government in 2011.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Burma. Military Golpe, arrested Aung San Suu Kyi.

Source from: Notizie Geopolitiche.net.

1st of february 2021

The coup in Burma had been in the air for days, ever since the army, which controls a quarter of the effective power of the eastern country, began to report electoral fraud regarding the November elections, which established victory full of the National League for Democracy (NDA). In the second free elections Aung San Suu Kyi’s party prevailed with a very large majority of 368 seats on the Union Solidarity and Development Party (USSDP), a coalition of 23 parties supported by the military and led by General Than Htay, who took 23 seats.
Last night, just before the new Parliament took office, communications and electricity supply were cut in the capital Naypyidaw and other cities, armored vehicles were shot and the military declared a state of emergency, but the news is struggling to leave the country.
At the first light of dawn, electricity returned, the army announced via TV that it had taken control of the country and that a year of state of emergency was established; power passed into the hands of General Min Aung Hlaing, who immediately ordered the arrest of State Councilor Aung San Suu Kyi, members of the government and leaders of the National League for Democracy.
The incredible thing is that only yesterday the military had denied the rumors of a possible coup and had full loyalty to democracy. Today, after the coup, they announced in a statement that “we will do everything possible to adhere to the democratic norms of free and fair elections, as established by the 2008 Constitution, lasting peace and inclusive well-being and prosperity for the people of Myanmar”. The presidency of the country passed to General Myint Swe.
At the moment the internet continues to be blocked, various services such as banking are suspended.
With a statement released via Twitter, Pesc Josep Borrell made it known that “I strongly condemn the military coup”, “I ask for an immediate release of the detainees”. “The election results and the constitution must be respected. The people of Burma want democracy. The EU is with them, “insisted the High Representative of EU Foreign Policy. In the same tone, the president of the European Council, Charles Michel, who expressed his condemnation of the coup and asked “the military to release those who have been illegally detained during raids across the country. The result of the elections must be respected and the democratic process must be restored”.
Secretary of state Antony Blinken intervened from Washington, calling on the Burmese army “to release all government officials as well as leaders of civil society and to respect the will of the Burmese people expressed in the democratic elections on November 8”.
Aung San Suu Kyi was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, but subsequently she was the subject of major criticism from world public opinion for having kept silent or in any case not having hindered the persecution of the ethnic-religious minority as a state councilor of the Rohingya, the subject of a real ethnic cleansing which sees General Min Aung Hlaing among its leaders.

Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Another Myanmar farce, Suu Kyi accused of “illegal possession” of walkie-talkies: she faces 3 years in prison “Import law violated”. China blocks the UN on the coup.

Source from: Rai. RaiNews24.

3rd of february 2021

Aung San Suu Kyi arrested for the illegal importation of a dozen walkie-talkies, her faithful president Win Myint detained for violating the restrictions imposed for the coronavirus.

Two days after a coup that has already confused many, the takeover of the army in Myanmar today took on farcical tones with the revelation of the “crimes” of the two highest leaders now in detention. But as unsettling as it is, it shows how serious the military is.

Meanwhile, the international community is divided, with China preventing a UN conviction. The Lady and Win Myint will remain under house arrest for 14 days, until mid-February, wrote Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy on Facebook: the accused walkie-talkies are those used by the security service of the Nobel Peace Prize winner. . Both violations, of the import-export law for Suu Kyi and the one on disaster management for Win Myint, carry a maximum sentence of three years in prison.

These are not the first bizarre accusations leveled at Suu Kyi: in 2010, when she was a prisoner in her mansion in Yangon, she was convicted of violating the conditions of her detention – and therefore disqualified from the subsequent elections – simply because a deranged American had crossed a I swim Lake Inya, coming into contact with SuuKyi.

The decision of the army, which officially took power for allegedly massive electoral fraud in the November elections overwhelmed by the League for Democracy, shows how the military is not afraid of international reactions. Perhaps also because they feel they have their backs covered by China: according to the BBC, the UN Security Council yesterday failed to agree on a joint declaration against the coup, because Beijing opposed it, thanks to its right of veto as a permanent member. An accusation denied by the Chinese foreign minister, but it is a fact that Beijing’s statements so far have been very lukewarm and marked by stability. It is true that in recent years the Chinese government had built good relations with Suu Kyi, but the economic and geopolitical interests that she has in the country prevail in Beijing’s calculations. Even if the West imposes sanctions, hypothesized today by the French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, their impact will necessarily be dampened.

In Burma, meanwhile, a nascent civil disobedience movement is taking shape, launched yesterday by some doctors and public employees who refuse to work for the military and protest against the arrest of at least 16 critics of civil society: among activists for human rights and Burmese journalists fear of being next is widespread. The most bold disobedient have been portrayed with three fingers raised, the same gesture in the film ‘Hunger Games’ used by pro-democracy protesters in Thailand. In the streets of Yangon, in the evening, motorists honk their horns and residents of entire neighborhoods start banging pots from windows, in a symbolic gesture to drive away evil spirits. But from how they are moving in the first days after the coup, it does not appear that they are planning to leave anytime soon.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Coup in Myanmar, military blocks Facebook hoping to limit protests Pots banged, screams and concerts: from punches on tables and car roofs to hot drums to drive away evil spirits: the people of Myanmar react to the coup, while the military tries to contain the protest by blocking social networks.

Source from: Rai. RaiNews24.

4th of february 2021

The national anthem, folk songs, the three-finger salute as in the Hunger Games trilogy already used in Thailand as a sign of protest against the military, are the new symbols of resistance to the coup in Myanmar. Pending the publication of the song “One day” by The Rebel Riot Band, intended to unite the demonstrators from all the cities of the country in a single choir, the military coup d’état escalates with the consequent decision to block Facebook. A way to hinder the growing civil disobedience that unites more segments of the population: ordinary people, doctors, celebrities and politicians.

A decision that the “new military government” of Myanmar has imposed to stem civil disobedience, invoked by the ousted government which also asks for the release of the leader Aung San Suu Kyi, winner of the last elections, and now under arrest (she risks 3 years in prison ).

Facebook is particularly popular in Myanmar and after an initial outage of telephone lines, mobile phone operators and Internet service providers have confirmed that they have implemented a directive from the communications ministry explicitly asking for social media to be temporarily blocked. The news was leaked via the Norwegian group Telenor.

UN: deep concern. The UN Security Council has expressed “deep concern” for Burma after the military coup.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Myanmar. Hunger Games-style three-finger salute and red ribbon, doctors on strike against coup. The staff of dozens of hospitals across Myanmar have chosen to strike as part of a growing civil disobedience campaign against the military coup and the removal of the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi.

Source from: Rai. RaiNews24.

3rd of february 2021

Also in Myanmar as in the recent pro-democracy demonstrations in Thailand, in these convulsive hours following the military coup, the sign of the three fingers with index, middle and ring fingers raised, inspired by the salute of the Capitol City rebels in the saga of “Hunger Games”, as a symbol of protest.

Already on Tuesday, health workers in 70 hospitals and health departments in Naypyidaw, Yangon and other cities had announced that they would not work under the military regime, denouncing the coup and accusing the generals of putting their own interests above those. of ordinary people despite the new coronavirus pandemic. Among the government hospitals concerned, not only those in Naypyidaw and Yangon, but also in Mandalay, Pyay, Bago, Myawaddy, Kyaukse, Monywa, Sagaing, Pyin Oo Lwin, Magwe and Nyaung U.

“We refuse to obey the orders of a illegitimate military regime which has shown that it has no regard for our poor patients”, a statement read. The campaign, Frontier Myanmar writes, could be the first major political test for the new military regime, which so far has met with little tangible opposition to the coup launched at dawn on Monday.

Meanwhile, the Facebook page that coordinates the campaign has accumulated almost 150,000 followers in just 24 hours. “They won’t stop this movement until the elected government is restored”, said Kyaw, a surgeon at West Yangon General Hospital who is on strike.

The first signs of civil disobedience were seen on Wednesday evening. At 8:00 pm local time, thousands of citizens decided to express their anger at the military takeover by banging pots and lids from balconies and honking cars on the street. It happened in the economic capital Yangon but also in other cities; a form of civil disobedience that, according to some, could be repeated every day as a form of opposition to military action.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Coup in Myanmar. Aung San Suu Kyi party calls for release. Celebration in the Rohingya refugee camps.

Source from: Rai. RaiNews24.

2 of february 2021

Hundreds of parliamentarians ‘confined’ to government housing in the capital Naypyidaw in the aftermath of the coup. Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party calls on the military to honor the results of last November’s elections and release all detainees. Biden condemns the coup and threatens sanctions. Celebration in the Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh.

Aung San Suu Kyi’s party called for the immediate release of the Nobel Peace Prize, arrested after news of a military coup in Myanmar. Aung San Suu Kyi is reportedly under house arrest in her home in the capital Naypyidaw, according to a collaborator of her. The Councilor of State appealed to the population to “not surrender” and to “protest wholeheartedly against the military coup”. “We ask – reads the appeal on the social network of the National League for Democracy – the immediate release of all detainees, including the president (Win Myint) and the councilor of state (Suu Kyi). This coup is a stain in the history of the Burmese state and army”.
An anonymous voice from the Parliament.
One of the detained parliamentarians asking for anonymity told AP that he and hundreds of parliamentarians, about 400, were arrested and taken to the complex. residential in Naypyitaw. There they are able to talk to each other and communicate by telephone with the constituencies, but they are not allowed to go out. Suu Kyi is not with them and the police are guarding the residence. “We had to stay awake. and on the alert, “the deputy said. The military said the act of force was necessary because the government had not acted after the military’s allegations of fraud in the November elections – in which the ruling party Suu Kyi won the majority of seats. Elections took place despite the coronavirus pandemic.
All in the hands of the General Min Aung Hlaing.
In a statement to Myawaddy TV, owned by the military, it was heard that Gen. Min A ung Hlaing, would be destined to command the country for a year. According to General Hlaing, the coup was “inevitable”. “This path was inevitable for the country and that is why we had to choose it”, he said. The names of the new ministers announced, 11 members will make up the cabinet made up of military generals, former military generals and former advisors to a previous government led by former general Thein Sein.
Biden threatens sanctions and aid cuts.
President Joe Biden condemns the military coup in Myanmar and calls for the release of leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other government members and activists. “We call on the military to immediately leave power, release arrested activists and officials, lift all restrictions on telecommunications and refrain from violence against civilians”, Biden said in a statement released by the White House. The US administration is ready for a drastic cut in the aid to the country. This was announced by the US State Department. And again “The United States has lifted sanctions against Myanmar in the last decade due to the progress made towards democracy, but reversing these progress will require an immediate revision of our sanctions law followed by appropriate action”.
London summons the Burmese ambassador to the United Kindom of the Great Britain.
The British government also condemns the “coup” and calls for the “immediate release” of the head of government, Aung San Suu Kyi, and the “illegally” arrested civilians. British diplomacy announced it. Burmese Ambassador Kyaw Zwar Minn was summoned to the Foreign Ministry and British Undersecretary for Asia Nigel Adams “condemned the military coup and illegal detention of civilians, including Aung San Suu Kyi”, a spokesperson said. of the ministry. The undersecretary asked for “guarantees on the safety of all detainees and asked for their immediate release”.
Meeting of the Security Council of the United Nations, Session of Emergency.
The Security Council of the United Nations will hold an emergency meeting this morning on the situation in Burma following the military coup. This is indicated by a work program of the current British presidency of this body, approved today by its members.
Rohingya party for the arrest of the Nobel Peace Prize.
The Rohingya forced to flee the former Burma in Bangladesh due to the bloody military repression three years ago, rejoiced at the arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi by the Burmese army . News of his detention spread quickly to overcrowded refugee camps in Bangladesh, where one million Rohingya live. “She is the reason for all our suffering. Why shouldn’t we rejoice?” Said community leader Farid Ullah in Kutupalong, the largest refugee camp in the world. For Mohammad Yusuf, an official from the nearby Balukhali camp, “it was our last hope, but he ignored our distress and supported the genocide against the Rohingya”. Some Rohingya have organized special prayers to greet “justice”. “If the camp authorities had allowed it, you would have seen thousands of Rohingya marching to celebrate”, he commented.
Maung Kyaw Miun, spokesman for the influential Rohingya Student Union, said that “there is now hope that the minority can return to their villages”. Unlike an elected government, this military government will need international support to resist. So we hope they look into the Rohingya problem to relieve international pressure”, he explained. Bangladeshi officials said they are “monitoring” the 270km border with Myanmar for further influx of Rohingya refugees. About 740,000 Rohingya, a persecuted minority in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar, fled the Burmese state of Rakhine following the 2017 attacks by the Buddhist army and militias and defined as genocide by the United Nations. Overthrown today by a military coup, Aung San Suu Kyi was the l ‘then head of the government and in 2019 he defended the army in hearings in the International Criminal Court on atrocities reported by the Rohingya, including rape and murder.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
South-Eastern Asia. The controversial leader of Myanmar: who is Aung San Suu Kyi?

Source from: Avvenire.

Monday, February 1st, 2021

Who is Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel laureate who leads Myanmar. She had been strongly criticized in the last years during her gouvernment at the Foreign Affairs Ministery of her country, the Myanmar-Bourma in the West for the Rohingya humanitarian crisis and situation.
From champion of human rights in Myanmar to “denier” of crimes against the Rohingya. Ms. Aung San Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace Prize winner 1991, is the leader of the party that obtained the majority in the Burmese parliament in the last elections and in fact holds the role of head of government (after the 8 November elections net from his party, the National League for Democracy, ed).
Aung San Suu Kyi was born on June 19, 1945 in Rangoon, Burma (now Myanmar). Icon of democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi is one of the most important symbols in the world of peaceful resistance against oppression. In November 2015, in the first elections considered free, her party won the elections in Myanmar, marking a fundamental turning point for the country and placing the future of the former Burma in her hands.
His role as opposition leader, decisive for the end of more than half a century of military dictatorship, has undergone an evolution that for many has the appearance of a surrender to the generals, but which above all has questioned his democratic faith of she. Its prolonged silences, having “accepted” the violence and abuses committed against the Muslim minority have contributed to clouding its image in the West, so much so that the European Parliament in 2020 wanted to distance itself from the 1990 decision, when Strasbourg decided to award her the Sakharov prize for freedom of thought.
In December 2019, she was also called to defend herself before the International Criminal Court in The Hague against the accusation of genocide against the Muslim minority. In her institutional role, Suu Kyi had to answer for the accusations of genocide made by the Hague Criminal Court against those soldiers who for twenty years she herself fought by sacrificing a lot on a personal level and several times running serious risks.
Today, however, the tragedy of an entire country, Myanmar, is superimposed in the image of the world by that of Rohingya Muslims subjected to waves of persecution that have resulted in the accusation of genocide.
A Buddhist majority country, Myanmar has always considered the Rohingya to be “Bengali” from Bangladesh and since 1982 has denied them citizenship, rendering them stateless and denying them freedom of movement and other fundamental rights. The accusation is a military campaign conducted in 2017 in the Rakhine State, on the west coast of Myanmar, which forced 700,000 people to flee to neighboring Bangladesh. There is talk of villages razed to the ground and set on fire, thousands of deaths and systematic rapes. Both the government and the military have always rejected allegations of atrocities.
Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi in front of the judges of the International Court of Justice of the Dutch capital had thus defended the army: «It cannot be excluded that the military used a disproportionate force. But genocide is not the only hypothesis».

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.

Analysis. Myanmar, the military still in power. The unknown San Suu Kyi.

Source from: Avvenire.

Monday, February 1st, 2021

The return to power of the military can hardly surprise those who habitually follow the events of the former Burma, now Myanmar. In all likelihood, their reasons will soon become clearer.
The return to power of the military can hardly surprise those who habitually follow the events of the former Burma, now Myanmar. In all likelihood, their reasons and intentions will soon become clearer, but in fact, the power they held openly for almost half a century from 1962 to 2011 by terrorizing the population, imprisoning or decimating opponents and attacking without bending ethnic minorities who claimed identity and rights, they never left him.
The claim, today, to have intervened to safeguard the Constitution clearly reveals their intentions, given that the one in force is a Charter written by them, approved in a referendum-farce while a cyclone was underway which at the beginning of May 2008 cost the country 140 thousand dead and missing, simply placed in uncertainty and blackmail any parliament or government that followed after the “restitution” to civilians of power since 2011.
Precisely the risk after the overwhelming victory of the rivals of the National League for Democracy that last November left only 33 seats against 396 for groups associated with the interests of the armed forces, of the start of a path to modify the Constitution to take away their prerogatives more negative for a real democracy, including 25 per cent of the seats guaranteed to them and therefore the right of veto, prompted action. An action that they had anticipated or at least envisaged since they denounced fraud during the elections, asked for a recalculation of votes and then – given the impossibility of obtaining satisfaction – they had relaunched their “constitutional” role.
Other elements may have encouraged a move that hides heavy risks, starting with international sanctions already announced against the coup generals and an internal reaction that could develop in the next few hours or days with a possible repression.
First of all, the risk for men in uniform that the Nobel Peace Prize winner, Aung San Suu Kyi, still a reference for the League, could regain full possession of a role not only political and ministerial but also ideal of a people who believed in it for twenty years and which has made it a symbol of the nonviolent struggle for democracy. Its international prestige, tarnished by not being able to oppose the genocidal persecution of Rohingya Muslims in Arakan (Rakhine), has weakened, but Burmese democracy currently has no credible substitute.
Precisely the international pressure on the military for the persecution of the Rohingya could have been another element that convinced the military leadership (or at least the part less dialogue and more connected with the vast economic interests that the armed forces maintain in many areas of the Country, starting with those on the border inhabited by minorities, such as Arakan). With a probably Chinese role, in all likelihood officially of mediation with the aim of guaranteeing Beijing the continuity of its Belt and Road Initiative, but where the need to guarantee an outlet to the “warm seas” and strategic supremacy towards neighboring India which Burmese democracy, however fragile and in need of support in infrastructure, trade and aid, has so far largely denied it.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Yangon. Coup d’etat in Myanmar, San Suu Kyi arrested. Call of the bishops for peace.

Source from: Avvenire.

Monday, February 1st, 2021

After days of growing tension between government and army that contested the regularity of the elections. State of emergency for one year. The condemnation of the United States.
The prelates: vigilance and prayer.
The Burmese head of government Aung San Suu Kyi was “arrested” by the military. A spokesman for the Nobel Prize party, the National League for Democracy (LND), told AFP. All powers in Myanmar have been transferred to General Min Aung Hlaing, chief of the armed forces.
The decision was announced by the army shortly after the announcement of the state of emergency for a year and the interim presidency entrusted to General Myint Swe, who was one of the two vice-presidents in office. Aung San Suu Kyi urged the Burmese people to “not accept the coup”: the Burmese leader’s party reported.
“We have heard that she is being held in Naypyidaw (the country’s capital, ed)”, spokeswoman Myo Nyunt said. Other party officials were also arrested. No confirmation from the army spokesman. The military has been reporting fraud for several weeks during the legislative elections last November, overwhelmingly won by the LND. The arrests took place a few hours before the inaugural meeting of the newly installed parliament. Under the pretext of the coronavirus pandemic, the elections “were neither free nor fair”, army spokesman Major General Zaw Min Tun assured at a press conference last week.
The military claims to have identified millions of cases of fraud, including thousands of centenarians or minors who would be among the voters. More than a dozen embassies, including that of the United States and the delegation of the European Union, last Friday had urged Burma to “adhere to democratic standards”, which, together with the UN, feared the coup. The party of Aung San Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace Prize laureate in 1991, highly criticized internationally for managing the Muslim Rohingya crisis but still adored by the majority of the population, won a landslide victory in November. It is the second victory in the general elections since 2011, when the junta that governed the country for half a century was dissolved. The military, however, retains very important power, having control over three key ministries (Interior, Defense and Borders).
The United States “continues to affirm its strong support for the democratic institutions” of Burma and “in coordination with our partners in the area, we call upon the armed forces and all other” stakeholders “to adhere to democratic norms and to release prisoners”. This was stated by the White House, noting that President Joe Biden was briefed on the events in Burma, including the arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi. The US, “alarmed” by the information coming from Burma, is opposed to any attempt to alter the result of the recent elections or prevent a democratic transition”.
The bishops: vigilance and prayer
In a difficult and critical phase for the future of the country, “we must live with a spirit of vigilance and prayer” especially by praying for peace: this is the appeal addressed to the faithful by the Auxiliary Bishop of Yangon, Msgr. John Saw Yaw Han – and received by Agenzia Fides – spread while among the population there is concern and disorientation given the military intervention and the declaration of a state of emergency in the nation.
While Cardinal Charles Maug Bo, Archbishop of Yangon, is visiting the Kachin state for pastoral reasons, in a message from the Archdiocese of Yangon, sent to Agenzia Fides, and signed by the Auxiliary Bishop Msgr. Saw Yaw Han, the people of God are invited to experience this delicate passage of national life with the utmost prudence.
Special attention should be paid to priests, who are visited by the faithful as leaders and points of reference: “They should be vigilant and control the people who enter the Church complex, for security reasons”, he said. Furthermore, to maintain unity and coherence of communication, priests, religious and parish priests are asked “not to issue individual declarations”, which could be conflicting, creating further uncertainty and bewilderment. Priests are invited “to watch over the liturgical services, encouraging all the faithful to pray intensely for peace in Myanmar”.
On the other hand, in the awareness that the social situation could become critical, the note asks to “provide food reserves to avoid shortages” and “also take care of stocks of medicines, for every need for people’s health”. Finally, for any particular situation, alarm or emergency, all the ecclesial communities in the area are urged to contact Bishop John Saw Yaw Han without delay.
A few days ago, as the political situation was precipitating, a seven-point appeal was issued, promoted by religious leaders of different communities, members of “Religions for Peace of Myanmar”, and signed by Cardinal Charles Maung Bo, on behalf of the Federation of the Episcopal Conferences of Asia.
The text called upon rulers, ethnic, political and military leaders, and all people of good will, to “a greater commitment to peace and reconciliation”. The appeal, reported by Agenzia Fides, asked to: create the conditions for peace in Myanmar; eliminate all ethnic discrimination; demilitarize Myanmar; seek political solutions to major issues; continue to reform the judiciary, education, social security and health systems; decentralize the decision-making process; in this way to prepare the new generations for a prosperous and peaceful future.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Who is Aung San Suu Kyi, history and critical biography of a Nobel Peace Prize winner.

Source from: Lifegate.it.

The biography of the Nobel Aung San Suu Kyi is linked with the history of his parents and Myanmar (formerly Burma). Between nationalism, Western influences and compromises with the army.
The biography of Aung San Suu Kyi (acronym Aung San Suu Kyi) is closely linked with that of his family and with the history of Myanmar (formerly Burma). A path of lights, shadows, dark areas, between nationalism, western influences and devotion to the army, founded by his father. His concept of democracy, although supported for about twenty years by forces from the west of the world, is rooted in Asia, where the military often plays a preponderant role. Even his vision of a nation, never really realized after independence from the British (1948), is not split from the majority religion, the “Theravada” Buddhism. With these premises, it is easier to understand why the leader of the Burmese democratic struggle does not fully correspond to the image of an activist spread by our media and recently rejected by her.
Myanmar is perhaps the last Asian frontier for the business of foreign companies, in a strategic position between India and China, its largest economic partner. Here too international balances are at stake. And Aung San Suu Kyi knows it well, finally freed from house arrest, just when the military junta wore civilian clothes and opened up to neoliberalism. Since then, the so-called “The Lady” has no longer opposed the generals, not even when they carried out ethnic cleansing of “Rohingya” Muslims, forcing them to flee en masse to Bangladesh. In order not to upset the Buddhist Bamar electorate and compromise the civilian part of the government, you have denied what the UN has defined as crimes against humanity and war. For many Burmese, Bamar and minorities, there remains the only foothold against a total dictatorship. However, which politician who cares about fundamental rights can indulge those who violate them continuously?
Aung San Suu Kyi takes the first steps together with her country, which from a colony of the British Empire is on its way to the republic. Leading this process is her father Aung San her, from whom she inherits not only the first part of her name, but also the inspiration and ideology that will characterize her political future. Aung San is killed when Suu Kyi is only two years old. However, her story appears to be that of a designated daughter.
Mother Khin Kyi, politician and ambassador.
Probably, it is her mother Khin Kyi who keeps the figure of her father alive in Aung San Suu Kyi until adulthood, but also directly transmits the science and art of politics to her. Khin Kyi, a former nurse who met her future husband in the hospital during World War II, is a tenacious and educated woman. Against her family’s wishes, she leaves her village and moves to Rangoon to practice at General Hospital. And she, at 30, in 1942 she married Aung San, to whom she had treated the wounds of the fighting. Their union is very strong. They will have four children and Khin Kyi will fill her husband’s seat, which remained vacant after her assassination, in the first independent Burma parliament.
Khin Kyi, after the loss of her spouse and two children, embarks on a brilliant political career. In 1953 you become Burmese prime minister of social welfare. And in 1960 she is the first woman in her country to head a diplomatic mission: she is ambassador to New Delhi when the Indian prime minister is Jawaharlal Nehru. In India, she takes her 15-year-old daughter Aung San Suu Kyi with her, while her eldest son, Aung San Oo, goes to study in England. Nehru allows them to live in the so-called “Burma house”, now the seat of the Indian congress.
Ne Win, the one who with the coup of 1962 will overthrow the fragile Burmese democracy to establish the military dictatorship. The same one against which Aung Sa Suu Kyi will find herself fighting half a century later.
The big leap. From cosmopolitan girl to beacon of democracy.
Aung San Suu Kyi grows up in a context where the intimate sphere intersects, even tragically, with international history. After the disappearance of her 8-year-old brother, drowned in an accident, she moves with her mother and her older brother to the colonial-style mansion on Lake Inya in Rangoon, where she still lives. She goes to Methodist English High School, showing a talent for foreign languages. You speak three in addition to Burmese: English, French and Japanese. At the University of New Delhi, where her mother was an ambassador between 1960 and 1967, she graduated in political science. At this point, she leaves for Great Britain, where she graduates again in politics, philosophy and economics from St Hugh’s College in Oxford. Here she meets her future husband, Michael Aris, also from a family of diplomats and servants of the British crown. Aris is about to become a private tutor for the King of Bhutan’s children and one of the leading experts in Buddhist, Himalayan and Tibetan history.
Before getting married, however, Aung San Suu Kyi agrees to work for three years at the United Nations headquarters in New York. She is convinced by Ma Than E, an expert in information services and a family friend. Aung San Suu Kyi calls her “Aunt Dora”, from the stage name of her that the woman – with a daring life and influential political friends – had given herself in her youth, when she was one of the most famous Burmese singers.
In the 1960s we are at the height of the “cold war” and Burma is an unstable but not isolated country. Rather. While Suu Kyi works at the Glass Palace, the secretary general is the Burmese U Thant, one of the founders of the Non-Aligned Countries Movement, which opposes both the Soviet and the US blocs. U Thant embodies a cultured, dynamic elite, fundamental in the weaving of relations between Asia and the rest of the world. As a skilled diplomat, he even manages to mediate between the US president, John Kennedy, and the prime minister of the USSR, Nikita Khrushchev, in the Cuban missile crisis.
1948-1962: from independence to military dictatorship.
What has happened in the meantime in Burma? After independence, the post of prime minister is held for three terms by U Nu, a former student leader and co-founder of “AFPFL” with Aung San. Burma is plagued by outbreaks of war and infighting in the anti-fascist League itself (the Aung San coalition). Some communist armed groups and several separatist armies rise up. In the north, on the border with China, the troops of the Kuomintang, the Chinese nationalist party that has withdrawn to the island of Taiwan, settle. This puts the Burmese central authorities in difficulty, poised between US aid that supports the Kuomintang and neighboring China under the communist regime of Mao Tse Tung. The Burmese army is also weak and fragmented. The ethnic Karen factions are progressively marginalized. And commander Ne Win is increasingly affirmed, forming his own militia with the consent of U Nu.
The prime minister forges too strong a bond with his old fighting partner. Together with Aung San, U Nu and Ne Win had been trained by the Japanese in the “brigade of thirty” and had founded the “AFPFL”. U Nu makes decisions that undermine the republican union. In ’61 he declared Buddhism the state religion, favoring a nationalism on a religious basis that would favor Buddhist fundamentalism and alienate minorities, Christians, animists, Muslims, Hindus. In fact, he prepares the ground for dictatorship. In 1962, after becoming an army general, Ne Win overthrew the unstable republic in a coup.
Burma sinks into a military dictatorship, a socialist and isolationist single party. It is the “New Burmese road to socialism”, which combines Soviet-style state planning with local beliefs and the Theravada Buddhist tradition. A country with great growth potential, due to its vast natural resources, is sinking into economic meltdown. Ne Win nationalizes all commercial and agricultural activities. It breaks with China, which since independence has supported communist uprisings. Launch a xenophobic campaign against Chinese and South Asian immigrants and Sino-Burmese citizens, exacerbating ethnic conflicts. Furthermore, by closing the economic borders with the Communist People’s Republic, it favors illegal trafficking. And when inflation rises, everyone is forced to resort to the black market. In Shan state, the war of the Burmese Communist Party against the Tatmadaw intensifies. The nationalism of the majority Bamar (Burmese) Buddhist ethnic group is imposed with violence. The one headed by Ne Win is nothing more than a corrupt system, which governs nothing, but aggravates pre-existing problems. With it, the dream of Aung San Suu Kyi’s father and of anyone who worked for a republican union vanishes.
Eighties: the riots and the return of Aung San Suu Kyi to Burma.
From England, what will Aung San Suu Kyi think of what is happening at home? In 1967 his mother Khin Kyi returned from India to Burma. Aung San Suu Kyi would visit her at least three times a year. What will they talk about in their ancient villa, which was a meeting place for intellectuals and politicians? For almost twenty years, after being employed at the UN, we do not know much about the two women: mother and daughter, very united by a dramatic existence. There are no traces of activism against the military junta. In the 1970s, Aung San Suu Kyi married Aris and gave birth to two children. And in the following decade, he resumed studying philosophy and literature at the Soas (School of oriental and african studies) in London. She would seem to dedicate herself solely to the role of mother and researcher. Certainly, by her own admission, she is aware of the riots that in 1985 were launched against the Ne Win regime for the first time. The students of Rangoon, the workers and the monks of Mandalay (second urban center, after Rangoon) are protesting against monetary policy and the immense public debt. As early as 1971, the UN had included Burma in the group of least developed countries. And, when the schools reopened almost two years later, in 1987, the dissent organized itself into clandestine groups. Burma is in turmoil. The peasants also rebel. The dictatorship has not only made them poorer, but has also betrayed the feeling of national pride ingrained in the population.
At the end of the 1980s in the West there is no longer any mention of the “country of a thousand pagodas”. It seems to have disappeared from geographic maps, from travelers’ routes and from media agendas. Instead, popular domestic resentment fueled by economic problems is about to explode. In 1988, the world will look again with dismay at the violent repression of thousands of protesters. Between March and June, in many regions, crowds of students, citizens, members of ethnic minorities and monks rebel against the government that is starving them. They begin to invoke “democracy”, but without having a very clear meaning. One thing is certain: they no longer trust the regime.
Just that March 1988, Aung San Suu Kyi returned to Burma to assist her sick mother and witnessed mass abuse. Ne Win gives the order to kill the demonstrators. The dead are countless. But eventually he resigns in July. In his place, however, comes the so-called “butcher of Rangoon”, Sein Lwin, a retired general of Ne Win’s personal militia, infamous for having some anti-coup students slaughtered in 1962. Dissidents prepare for national protest and the general strike of 8-8-88. In the revolt, which will last until 31 August, 3,000 civilians are said to have been killed.
In these days, Aung San Suu Kyi’s second life begins, that of a political leader struggling to establish multi-party democracy in his country. According to the facts, it would be a very fast conversion that took place in just six months. A big leap. Already on August 26, at the age of 43, Aung San’s daughter gave her first public speech at the Buddhist temple of Shwedagon in front of half a million people.
Two aspects emerge from the introduction. Aung San Suu Kyi addresses the monks first and then the people, emphasizing the link with the Buddhist religion in his entry into politics. Furthermore, he speaks for the first time of “democracy”. The party that has led since then, National League for Democracy (NLD), will have precisely this term in its acronym and will officially be born a month later, on 27 September 1988. The details of how the NLD was formed are not clear. But it is important to remember that among the founders – in addition to Aung San Suu Kyi – there are army personalities in conflict with Ne Win: Tin Oo, former general and former defense minister, accused of having already attempted a coup against the dictator; Aung Shwe also commander of the tatmadaw; Colonel Kyi Maung and General Aung Gyi, who after participating in Ne Win’s coup, had left his executive almost immediately. Meanwhile, the military regained power a few days earlier, on September 18. The new council has given itself the name of The State Law and Order Restoration Council (Slorc).
World icon. Twenty years of fights, arrests, trauma.
What does Aung San Suu Kyi mean by democracy? In Shwedagon’s speech, he says he learned this “faith” from his father Aung San, citing him: «The only ideology consistent with freedom, which promotes and strengthens peace”. And then he urges the crowd to stay united and disciplined, adding a fundamental aspect of his political vision. For Aung San Suu Kyi, unity is a necessity. We need to bridge the gap that has been created between the people and the army, which his own father created. He admits that he feels strongly attached to the armed forces, but urges them to be respected by the people. From the beginning, it could be said that Aung San Suu Kyi’s idea of democracy resembles that of other Asian countries, where the role of the army is preponderant. He also invites the crowd to demonstrate in a peaceful way, inspired by Gandhi’s policy of non-violence. In the future he will say: «I support non-violence not for moral reasons, but for practical and political reasons”, demonstrating that he has assimilated the concreteness of his father.
Aung San Suu Kyi aims at a multi-party democracy and a union (probably on the Indian model, borrowed from the United Kingdom) in which different ethnic groups have a voice. But the repression of the SLORC becomes even more severe. In 1989 the military in power declare martial law and begin arresting thousands of people, supporters of democratization and human rights activists. Prisons are filled with political prisoners. Back to the pre-colonial geographical names: Myanmar replaces Burma, and the capital Rangoon becomes Yangon. On 20 July Aung San Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest. In an atmosphere of confusion, with “The Lady” – as the Burmese call her – that she cannot stand as a candidate, the SLORC grants new elections. In 1990, Aung San Suu Kyi’s party won 80 percent of the seats, but the junta did not recognize the result. Most of the newly elected are arrested. Eight of them form “a government in exile” in a border area with Thailand. Its premier is Sein Win, Aung San Suu Kyi’s cousin. Soon the exiles will flee to the United States to establish headquarters in Rockville, Maryland. Other offices will be opened in Bangkok, New York and New Delhi. The Burmese diaspora towards the US and northern Europe is expanding. The Burmese democratic lobby is supported by various organizations and governments, including a US democratic fund, the Soros foundation, the Open society institute, Norway, Denmark and Sweden.
In the NLD the contrasts are accentuated. Some ex-soldiers criticize the line too soft. One of the party’s founders, former general Aung Gyi resigns, pointing to “communist” components. And, as Aung San Suu Kyi’s popularity grows, she deepens her interest in Buddhism. Perhaps, to get as close as possible to the bamar majority. Between ’90 and ’91 the international community describes her as “a heroine of democracy”, awarding her the Sakharov Prize and the Nobel Peace Prize that she will withdraw only in 2012. Among the organizations that support her, the largest is the Burma campaign based in London. In 1992 Than Shwe succeeded Saw Maung as president of the SLORC. And in 1995 Aung San Suu Kyi will finally be freed after six years.
Her path, however, is paved with party splits, attacks, health problems and two new house arrest (2000-2002 / 2003-2010). In all, she will spend 15 years of political life locked up in her home. In 1997 it was the international community to shake the power of the generals. The US economic sanctions (under the administration of Democrat Bill Clinton) weigh on the Burmese government which promises, by changing its name, “peace and development” (SPDC). Suu Kyi starts the dialogue between the junta, the NLD and the independence movements. In 1999 she gave up visiting her dying husband in London, because she fears that the junta will not let her return. In the new millennium, General Than Shwe continues the repression of the border populations and blocks the activities of the NLD on several occasions. Aung San Suu Kyi’s line does not lead to dialogue. You are controversial about the proposal to “boycott tourism”, which enriches the junta but gives a living to many Burmese.
Road for democracy, saffron revolution and cyclone Nargis.
In 2002, the UN initiated secret negotiations with the junta to free Aung San Suu Kyi. And the following year, 2003, we start talking about reforms. But the times for the so-called “road for democracy” are not ripe. The Lady suffers an ambush similar to an earlier one in 1997. A pro-government squadron attacks her delegation visiting Depeyin. It is a massacre: Aung San Suu Kyi is spared, but at least 70 members of the NLD die. The Lady is incarcerated for three months in the well-known Ynsein prison in Yangon, with many other dissidents. After undergoing uterine surgery, she returns to house arrest.
The fate of Suu Kyi and her country is entrusted to the new premier Khin Nyunt. Far from the cities and coastlines frequented by tourists, the population succumbs to government persecutions. In rural regions, members of ethnic minorities are deported to labor camps and tortured. In large works, forced labor is a widespread practice. War and drug lords continue to control large areas, including those of the Golden Triangle, dotted with poppy plantations and a crossroads for international drug trafficking. Myanmar is the second largest opium producer in the world after Afghanistan.
On the border with Thailand, Laos and China, various separatist guerrillas fight against the government army. In conflicts, all sides – but especially the tatmadaw – employ child soldiers and porters, who make their way to the military on the minefields. The exodus of Rohingya Muslim refugees to Bangladesh and Karen to Thailand continues, despite the refusal of the two countries to host refugee camps. Only a few humanitarian associations have access to the country. The military government has a monopoly on television, radio and press, which are used as propaganda tools.
During the 2000s, UN negotiations continued to free Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2007 the US president, George W. Bush, extended financial sanctions, after he had inserted Myanmar into the so-called “axis of evil”. That same year, the UN envoy, Ibrahim Gambari, managed to meet her twice. Meanwhile, between August and October, thousands of monks, students and activists peacefully protest against the skyrocketing prices of oil, other types of fuel and basic necessities, such as rice, the main food of the local diet. Aung San Suu Kyi is allowed to meet the monks and be seen in public for the first time since 2003. The so-called “saffron revolution”, however, is repressed by the military with dozens of victims. As in the 1980s, the population demonstrated mainly for economic reasons and mistrust of the government. While the ruling elite grows rich, public spending on health and education is among the lowest in the world. One in three children in Myanmar suffers from chronic malnutrition.
In 2008, cyclone Nargis devastated the Irrawaddy River delta, causing the death of at least 134,000 people and damage for 4 billion dollars. Not even this natural disaster, in the most important area for rice cultivation, moves the junta which refuses foreign humanitarian aid and extends house arrest in Aung San Suu Kyi. The international campaign is then intensified for the Burmese government to commit itself to national reconciliation, the restoration of democracy and the full respect of fundamental rights. In addition to the West (EU, UK, USA) and the Nobel Peace Princes such as the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu, various Asian governments (except China, Russia, Vietnam and Thailand) are also strongly calling for Aung San Suu Kyi’s release, which in the meantime received another sentence. A US citizen broke into his home under mysterious circumstances, generating a very harsh reaction from the generals. Aung San Suu Kyi is expected to be jailed for 7 years and forced into forced labor. After this strange event, diplomatic actions will be even more incisive. Under the Obama administration, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is directly engaged in negotiations with the military. Japan promises new aid and British Prime Minister Gordon Brown promises the junta more years of economic isolation and stagnation if he does not grant free elections. The vote organized by the junta in 2010 is boycotted by the NLD itself but, a week later, on November 13, 2010, Aung San Suu Kyi is freed.
Rise and fall. Ethnic persecution denied.
In the 1920s, the junta wore civilian clothes, but Myanmar remained largely controlled by the former military. Although various ceasefire agreements are signed, a united nation does not yet exist. And after an initial enthusiasm for Aung San Suu Kyi who returns to the political arena, travels the world and sees his children again, enormous perplexities emerge about his work. In 2011 Thein Sein became president, a reformist among the former generals, who promotes progressive democratic and above all economic openings: amnesties for many political prisoners, creation of workers’ unions, new parliamentary elections in 2012 in which the NLD wins, investments by multinationals. Aung San Suu Kyi enters the chamber as an opposition leader.
Neoliberal openings, assault on resources and tepid democratic reforms.
Myanmar returns to attract international attention. The main game being played is not so much that of rights, but of opening up to capitalism. And the negotiations of the various governments, including the Italian one, revolve around business opportunities. Various multinationals (especially oil companies) are already present in the country. If the government allows itself to neoliberalism, the former Burma can transform itself into the last “eldorado” of Asia. It is, in fact, in a strategic position between India and China, and has diversified resources: oil, gas, precious stones, timber, land, very low cost labor. Political stability is functional to business. With a known risk, however: development could bring with it the deformations it has already caused on the continent, including uncontrolled urbanization, the destruction of ecosystems, the expropriation of land known as land grabbing. In recent years, the exodus of many workers, including children and young people, to the cities begins.
The Obama administration supports the change process. Prior to the vote, Hillary Clinton met with both Thein Sein and Aung San Suu Kyi. And, in 2012, The Lady is received at the White House. Forbes lists her among the 41 most powerful women in the world. The EU suspends non-military sanctions. The European Commission is offering $ 100 million in aid. Some exiles can return to the country and open private newspapers. And in the new elections in 2015, Aung San Suu Kyi wins enough seats to form an executive. In reality, a two-headed government is established where the “military head” prevails over the “civil” one. Generals retain control of almost all ministries and 25 percent of seats in parliament. Aung San Suu Kyi, on the other hand, is the de facto leader, a sort of prime minister, councilor of state, foreign minister and minister of the president’s office. Under the constitution, however, she cannot become head of state because she is the widow of a foreigner and the mother of two British citizens. Her power is limited and precisely during the transition from dictatorship to democracy one of the blackest pages in Burmese history is consumed.
Aung San Suu Kyi denies crimes against the Rohingya. Buddhist extremism explodes.
Since 2012, minority communities of Rohingya Muslims living in the resource-rich western state of Rakhine (formerly Arakan) have been the target of attacks by the army and Buddhist fundamentalists, with entire villages razed to the ground, rape, summary killings and hundreds of thousands of people on the run. In a 2013 dossier, Human Rights Watch is the first to speak of “crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing”. Similar complaints from the UN, humanitarian workers, exiles and journalists follow, but the Burmese authorities do not stop the pogrom. Among the analysts, there are also those who speak of “genocide”. Starting from August 2017, the exodus becomes biblical. Out of around one million Rohingya, more than 700,000 flee on foot to neighboring Bangladesh. Others venture into the ocean to reach Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia. Of the rest, 140,000 are locked up in prison camps.
Aung San Suu Kyi refuses to acknowledge the abuse. Indeed, he denies or justifies them several times. He speaks of “exaggeration”, blames a small group of local guerrillas for the (disproportionate) reaction of the tatmadaw and refuses to call the Rohingya by their name. He completely embraces the diktats of the military, who in seventy years have never granted them citizenship. A 1982 law excluded Rohingya from the census of 135 ethnic groups. These stateless people, who have always been persecuted and deprived of rights, are not “illegal immigrants” and “recently” from Bangladesh as the government claims. They have lived in Rakhine since the Portuguese colonizers deported them as slaves from the Bengal delta. Subsequently, the English colonizers arrive to encourage community divisions. In India they favor separations between Hindus and Muslims, while in Burma they prepare the ground for a sort of “Buddhist Pakistan”. The borders of the current Rakhine state (formerly Arakan) changed until 1948, when Burma became independent. And the Rohingya have already been forced into two major forced displacements in 1978 (200,000 refugees) and 1991 (250,000).
When on a European tour, on November 2, 2013, Aung San Suu Kyi stops in Turin, it is personally asked by the writer of this article what she thinks about the “Rohingya” tragedy. She gets nervous. And to the second question about the monk Ashin Wirathu, leader of the racist propaganda against Muslims, she replies: «I don’t want to condemn a person». Yet the Mandalay cleric has been preaching against Muslims since the 1990s and is one of the leaders of the MaBaTha Buddhist fundamentalist movement. He is also part of a larger network of extremists, which includes the Buddhist nationalist organization Bodu Bala Sena of Sri Lanka. An arrest warrant for Wirathu will only be triggered in 2019 for “obscene and personal” sentences against Aung San Suu Kyi herself.
Aung San Suu Kyi, the designated daughter may have no heirs.
Aung San Suu Kyi chooses not to annoy the government military, who could dismiss her at any moment. According to observers, she is willing to do anything to save the civilian government and not lose the consent of the Buddhist Bamar electorate. You support the espionage allegations against two Burmese Reuters reporters who discovered the military massacre of ten Rohingya Muslims. She allows more than 300 dissidents to be arrested and tried in 2019, including students, poets, journalists, monks, environmental activists and trade unionists, as reported by Amnesty international. And when, in December 2019, the International Criminal Court opens hearings on alleged crimes against humanity, war and genocide, she goes to testify in The Hague, once again defending the government’s actions. Her old supporters express their disappointment. Desmond Tutu, proponent of post-apartheid reconciliation in South Africa, does so in an open letter. Meanwhile, in the neighboring states Rakhine and Chin (the latter with a Christian majority), another conflict intensifies, between Tatmadaw and Arakan army.
Win Tin, mentor of the young Aung San Suu Kyi incarcerated from 1989 to 2008, the real “Nelson Mandela of Myanmar”, before dying will express all his opposition: «Too soft. Too pro-establishment. Those who negotiate with the generals should never do so». And he adds: «Aung San Suu Kyi is revered by party members in a way harmful to democracy». At 75, did Aung San Suu Kyi create a cult of herself and her dynasty, as happened to other political figures in Asia? Are you forming a new ruling class that can continue – without you – in building a nation and a real democracy? For now, Aung San’s designated daughter appears to have no political heirs.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Narcotraffic: who is Tse Chi Lop, the new Chinese? “El Chapo” to conquer the Indo-Pacific. King of methamphetamine in 2018 earned between $ 8 and $ 17 billion. He is the No. 1 wanted man in Asia.

Source from:AMDuemila-AntiMafiaDuemila.

Thinking: What happened in a country where the production of opium and narcotics and the international trafficking of large quantities of opium and narcotic substances is closely linked to the economic and financial interests of primary importance of the exponents of the military junta in government power of the Burmese country; when the interests of a character like Tse Chi Loop become too strong and of such a high level, entering into friction, in conflict with those of the generals in government power dedicated to these shady and criminal trafficking in opium and drugs … (consideration):
«After years of international drug trade in Indo-Pacific countries, in particular methamphetamine in Myanmar and exported by the ton from Japan to Australia, the troubles returned in 2016. In November of that year a Taiwanese citizen named Cai Jeng Ze was stopped at Rangoon airport with two Jimmy Choo leather bags and two cell phones. Police noticed this because he had sore hands that kept rubbing nervously, typical of coming into contact with preparation chemicals. Customs police found two packages of ketamine on him and an address in Rangoon. 48 hours later, officers have visited and searched 622 kilograms of ketamine were found at that address while in the evening at the dock of the port of Rangoon more than a ton of methamphetamine crystals have been founded. But the revelation came in a photo found in one of Cai’s cell phones. An Australian Federal Police investigator based in Myanmar recognized in that shot the face of a certain Asian drug trafficker that intelligence had shown him the year before: Tse Chi Lop».
But the spotlight on him and his group only came on following the publication of an in-depth investigation by Reuters journalist Tom Allard. In fact, TSE is at the center of an international operation against drug trafficking, called “Kungur”, which the press had never mentioned before Reuters. An operation that sees the Australian police forces employed in unison with agencies from Asia, North America and Europe together with the authorities of Myanmar, China, Thailand, Japan, the United States and Canada. According to estimates by the UN agency for drugs and crime (UNODC), the volume of Sam Gor’s trade would control between 40% and 70% of the region’s entire methamphetamine sales, a thriving market that would grow. four times in the past five years».
There is a very dangerous new El Chapo in circulation. Another “drug king” who unlike Joaquin Guzmàn does not come from the tiny village of La Tuna in the rugged mountains of the Mexican state of Sinaloa, but from the other side of the Pacific: in China. His name is Tse Chi Lop and he is the most wanted man on the Asian continent, believed to be the head of a cartel linked to five Triads with which he became the author of gigantic drug trafficking operations. In 2018, he earned between 8 and 17.7 billion dollars, according to estimates by the UNODOC, the UN agency that deals with drugs and crime. “Tse Chi Lop is the Asian version of his Mexican ‘colleague’ and Colombian Pablo Escobar,” said Jeremy Douglas, Unodoc director for the eastern region. A man who despite the luxury in which he sails – in a single night he was able to lose 66 million dollars in the gambling halls of Macau without batting an eye – has managed to keep a low profile without getting noticed. In fact, his name has only recently come to the fore. But let’s continue in order. Tse Chi Lop’s (55) criminal history began in the province of Guadgong in the Canton region. In the wake of the Maoist Cultural Revolution, a group of disgraced Red Guards formed a criminal gang called the Great Circle, similar to a triad. The young Tse joined it and like other bandits he moved to Hong Kong, and then took refuge in Canada in 1988, where he obtained citizenship. In the meantime, he had become a mid-level heroin dealer. Ten years later, in 1998, his name reappeared after being arrested in New York. Over his head hung a request for a life sentence but he managed to mock the judges by claiming that his parents were dying, in need of continuous treatment, and that his son would have lungs. He was saved with only 9 years in a prison in Ohio, after which, in 2006, he returned to Canada. There he was able to fully resume his criminal activity by providing his new organization The Company or Sam Gor (in Cantonese “Brother number three”) with an apparently unbeatable professional mold and making discretion his winning weapon to make room in the world of traffic. drugs. After years of international drug trade in Indo-Pacific countries, in particular methamphetamine in Myanmar and exported by the ton from Japan to Australia, the troubles returned in 2016. In November of that year a Taiwanese citizen named Cai Jeng Ze was stopped at Rangoon airport with two Jimmy Choo leather bags and two cell phones. Police noticed this because he had sore hands that kept rubbing nervously, typical of coming into contact with preparation chemicals. Customs police found two packages of ketamine on him and an address in Rangoon. 48 hours later, officers have visited and searched 622 kilograms of ketamine were found at that address while in the evening at the dock of the port of Rangoon more than a ton of methamphetamine crystals have been founded. But the revelation came in a photo found in one of Cai’s cell phones. An Australian Federal Police investigator based in Myanmar recognized in that shot the face of a certain Asian drug trafficker that intelligence had shown him the year before: Tse Chi Lop.
But the spotlight on him and his group only came on following the publication of an in-depth investigation by Reuters journalist Tom Allard. In fact, TSE is at the center of an international operation against drug trafficking, called “Kungur”, which the press had never mentioned before Reuters. An operation that sees the Australian police forces employed in unison with agencies from Asia, North America and Europe together with the authorities of Myanmar, China, Thailand, Japan, the United States and Canada. According to estimates by the UN agency for drugs and crime (UNODC), the volume of Sam Gor’s trade would control between 40% and 70% of the region’s entire methamphetamine sales, a thriving market that would grow. four times in the past five years.

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Foreign Affairs. WORLD. Asia. Myanmar – Burma.
Aung San Suu Kyi appointed Minister for the Foreign Affairs. The Nobel Peace Prize winner is also the only woman in an executive DI Htin Kyaw, made up of 18 ministers.

Source from: Rai. RaiNews24.

22nd march 2016

The Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi will be the head of diplomacy of the new government of Myanmar, announced by her party, winner of the historic legislative elections in November 2015. “He will be foreign minister”, announced Zaw Myint Maung, spokesman for the National League for Democracy (Ndl), adding that he will have an active role in other ministries. The new Burmese government is made up of 18 ministers, all men together with the Nobel Peace Prize “Lady”. The proxies will be distributed at a later time. Aung san Suu Kyi, a former dissident who for decades fought for a democratic change in Myanmar, has had a prestigious place in the government formed by its very faithful become president. A role that should have been played by her after the overwhelming victory of her party in the November elections, hindered, however, by a constitutional blockade. According to some analysts, however, the Nobel Peace Prize winner may prefer an undemanding department, in order to maintain his roles as parliamentarian and leader of her party.

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